Garthbeg Coat Of Arms

The Lost Families of Stratherrick, Strathnairn, and Dunmaglass, Inverness-shire, Scotland

 

Home

History

Families

Notable People

Photos

Family Trees

Source Books

Source Links

Guest Book

Discussion Forum

 

 

 

Bond of Confederation between the Frasers of Foyers and the McTavishes of Stratherrick. 

The following document, extracted from the History of the Frasers of Lovat (1896, p.697), by Alexander Mackenzie (1838-98), was reprinted in the article on Simon Fraser of Ste. Anne’s (c1760-1839) by W.S. Wallace, Transactions of R.S.C., Series 3, Vol. 28, 1934, p. 54, 55]

 

“At Bellaloin, the 5th day of April, 1721, it is contracted, agreed, and finally determined: betwixt the parties following, viz.: - William Fraser of Foyers, James Fraser, Younger thereof, Hugh Fraser of Boleskine, William Fraser of Kinmonavie, John Fraser of Drummond, William Fraser of Dalcraig, John and Thomas Fraser, his sons; Thomas Fraser of Kinbrylie, John Fraser, son to Dunchea; John, Thomas, James and Donald Fraser, sons to the deceased Garthmore; John and Alexander Fraser, Simon’s sons in Dalchapel; John Donn Fraser in Forbeg, Alexander Fraser, in Knockie, and John Fraser, his son; Thomas Fraser, son to Bunchegavie; John Fraser, now of Bunchegavie; Alexander and Hugh Fraser, his sons; and Alexander Fraser, son to John Fraser in Bellaloin; Alexander Fraser in Mussadie, and William Fraser in Gortuleg, for themselves and in name and behalf and as burdens taken on them for their several friends and relations of the said family of Foyers, commonly called CLAN WILLIAM, and their respective servants and followers, on the one part; and for John McTavish of Little Garth, Tavish, his brother, John Mactavish, portioner of South Migavie, Tavish Mactavish of North Migavie, Duncan Mactavish in Kenmure, his brother, and Duncan Mactavish of Croachie, for themselves, and in name and behalf and as taking burden on themselves for the several friends and relations, commonly called CLAN TAVISH; and Ronald Macdonald of Achindich, John and Alexander Macdonalds, his brethren, for themselves and their friends and relations, and all of them as undertakers for their several tenants, servants, dependers and followers, on the other part in the manner following:  THAT IS TO SAY, forasmuch as for several years past frequent jealousies and animosities were created and entertained on small causes, and sometimes without any grounds at all which oftentimes ended in great mischief, and sometimes in bloodshed on either side, to the scandal of relation, and that harmony and good correspondence that should have been maintained betwixt so near neighbours and friends, who are so frequently bound to one another by the ties of consanguinity and affinity, therefore, and for the preventing the consequences of such jealousies for the future, the said William and James Fraser, elder and younger, of Foyers, and the said other persons of his family for themselves and in name and behalf, and as taking burden on them as aforesaid, on the one part, and the said party as contractors for themselves, etc on the other part, faithfully engage, bind, and oblige themselves, and promise their heirs and successors forever, to live in the strictest amenity, friendship, and good neighbourhood, and to maintain, defend, and assist one another in all actions, causes, pleas, and controversies, of what nature and degree whatsoever, whether civil or military, against all other clans, people or nature, or quality, soever, the King’s Majesty alone excepted.” 

The alliance between the Frasers and Mactavishes of Stratherrick was reflected later in the North West Company of Canada.  From Stratherrick came, on the one hand, Simon McTavish, William McGillivray, Duncan McGillivray, Simon McGillivray, Donald McTavish, and most of the other relatives of Simon McTavish in the fur-trade, and on the other hand probably most of the Frasers in the fur-trade.  That the Frasers entered the North West Company appears to have been due chiefly to the clannishness of Simon McTavish, based on ties of friendship and kinship which went back to the treaty of peace at Bellaloin in 1721. 

At the Battle of Culloden on 16 April 1746, the Fraser of Lovat contingent included two officers named McTavish (John McTavish, of Gartenbegg; Alexander McTavish, Brother to Gartenbegg) and the following fourteen rank and file, who surrendered after the battle, all surrendered 17-5-46

(Muster Roll of Prince Charles Edward Stuart’s Army 1745-46 (Aberdeen University Press, 1984):

 

McTavish, Alexander, Aberchalder                       McTavish, Hugue, Gartbegg [sic}

McTavish, Alexander, Gartenbegg                       McTavish, John, Gartbegg

McTavish, Alexander, Megavie                            McTavish, John, Megavie

McTavish, Donald, Aberchalder                           McTavish, John, Megavie

McTavish, Donald, Megavie                                 McTavish, Tavis, Aberchalder

McTavish, Dugald, Soullenegary                          McTavish, Tavish, Gartenbegg

McTavish, Farquhar, Easter Aberchalder  McTavish, Tavis, Megavie

 

Signatories to Bond of Confederation between the Frasers of Foyers & Mactavishes

 

William Fraser of Foyers,

James Fraser, Younger thereof,

Hugh Fraser of Boleskine,

William Fraser of Kinmonavie,

John Fraser of Drummond,

William Fraser of Dalcraig,

John and Thomas Fraser, his sons;

Thomas Fraser of Kinbrylie,

John Fraser, son to Dunchea;

John, Thomas, James and Donald Fraser, sons to the deceased Garthmore;

John and Alexander Fraser, Simon’s sons in Dalchapel;

John Donn Fraser in Forbeg,

Alexander Fraser, in Knockie,

and John Fraser, his son;

Thomas Fraser, son to Bunchegavie;

John Fraser, now of Bunchegavie;

Alexander and Hugh Fraser, his sons;

and Alexander Fraser, son to John Fraser in Bellaloin;

Alexander Fraser in Mussadie,

and William Fraser in Gortuleg,

for themselves and in name and behalf and as burdens taken on them for their several friends and relations of the said family of Foyers, commonly called CLAN WILLIAM, and their respective servants and followers, on the one part; and for

 

John McTavish of Little Garth,

Tavish, his brother,

John Mactavish, portioner of South Migavie,

Tavish Mactavish of North Migavie,

Duncan Mactavish in Kenmure, his brother, and

Duncan Mactavish of Croachie,

for themselves, and in name and behalf and as taking burden on themselves for the several friends and relations, commonly called CLAN TAVISH; and

 

Ronald Macdonald of Achindick,

John and Alexander Macdonalds, his brethren,

for themselves and their friends and relations, and all of them as undertakers for their several tenants, servants, dependers and followers, on the other part in the manner following…